RESEARCH

The Food is Medicine Coalition engages in research to prove that food truly is medicine, especially for those who have serious and chronic illnesses. 

 

Completed FIMC Agency Research


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Health Insurance Data Claims Study- Community Servings, Massachusetts General Hospital and Commonwealth Care Alliance

Researchers found that Community Servings clients had fewer inpatient admissions – resulting in a 16% net reduction in healthcare costs. In dollar terms, the average monthly medical costs for medically tailored meals participants was $843, compared to $1,413 for the control group, reflecting gross savings of $570 per month, or net savings (factoring in the cost of the meals) of $220 per month. The study suggests that medically tailored home-delivered meals are a cost-effective approach to managing the health of individuals with complex medical and social needs.

 
 
 
 
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Project Open Hand, San Francisco, UCSF School of Medicine/Center for Vulnerable Populations, Food=Medicine Study: Pub, Journal of Urban Health

In 2014 Project Open Hand partnered with UCSF to launch a pilot program to study and evaluate the intervention in Type 2 Diabetes, HIV and co-morbidly diagnosed populations. The completion of this study provides scientific data to demonstrate that Project Open Hand’s food does indeed equal medicine for diabetes and HIV clients.

Key Results: 63% reduction in hospitalizations, 50% increase in medication adherence and 58% decrease in client emergency room visits.

 


Manna, Philadelphia, PA, Examining Health Care Costs Among MANNA Clients and a Comparison Group: Pub. Journal Of Primary Care and Community Health

This study explored health care claims data on 65 MANNA clients over time in comparison with a matched set of Medicaid patients who did not receive MANNA services. This peer-reviewed research found that over the course of a year the MANNA clients accumulated an average of almost $12,000 less in medical expenses per month than the control group. The MANNA clients were hospitalized half as often, and, if they were hospitalized, the stay was 37% shorter and they were 23% more likely to be discharged to their home rather than sub-acute care. The cost savings among those who were hospitalized was dramatic with the mean monthly costs averaging $132,000 in the MANNA client group versus $220,000 in the comparison group.


God's Love We Deliver, New York, NY/Columbia Mailman School of Public Health, COMMUNITY HEALTH ADVISORY & INFORMATION NETWORK (chain) FACT SHEETS

The policy team at God's Love We Deliver, teamed up with Dr. Angela Aidala at Columbia's Mailman School of Public Health to analyze food-related questions in a longitudinal study of people living with HIV.

 

Food as Medicine White Paper- Community Servings

Provides extensive information on medically tailored home delivered meals and their positive effect on health outcomes.